Daily Archive: July 2, 2018

In Delhi Family Deaths, Autopsies Provide Chilling Details: 10 Points

New Delhi:

A day after 11 of a family were found mysteriously dead in their home in Delhi, an autopsy has confirmed that eight died because of hanging, without struggle, reported news agency PTI. These included the oldest member, 77-year-old Narayan Devi, earlier believed to have been strangled. The bodies of three generations of the Bhatia family were discovered in their home in north Delhi’s Burari by a neighbour who found their grocery shop shut on Sunday morning. The police were yet to establish the sequence of the deaths. A case of murder has been filed after handwritten notes pointed at a spiritual or mystical link to the deaths; the notes include what appears to be a guide to attaining salvation.

Here are the top 10 updates on Burari deaths:

  1. Two diaries have been found with what appear to be instructions on death and salvation. The details match with the way the bodies were found – faces wrapped almost entirely, mouths taped and hands tied behind the back.
  2. The police say the notes contain details of a "Badh puja" ritual, which means "everybody should hang like the branches of a banyan tree". Everybody should be on board, it was asserted in the jottings.
  3. The notes said no one could use the phone, so six phones were left together on silent mode.
  4. According to the police, the "instructions" included choosing a Thursday or Sunday, "following rituals strictly" and perform a havan or ritual. "The more dedication, the better the result," said the notes.
  5. Narayan Devi, found in her bed, also died because of hanging, the police believe. A rope was found hanging near her body and it is being investigated who took it off her neck, a PTI report said.
  6. The others were Narayan Devi’s daughter Pratibha, 57, sons Bhavnesh, 50, and Lalit Bhatia, 45, and their families. Bhavnesh’s wife Savita, 48, and their three children Meenu, 23, Neetu, 25, and 15-year-old Dhruv were found hanging. So were Lalit Bhatia’s wife Tina, 42, and their 15-year-old son Shivam.
  7. Pratibha’s daughter Priyanka, 33, who was engaged to be married last month, was also hanging. An IT company employee, she was said to be excited about the wedding later this year. Narayan Devi had one more son and a daughter who lived away.
  8. "I can’t believe that they committed suicide. Everyone was so happy. Someone has killed my family and the police have to find them," said Sujata Nagpal who lived in Panipat with the family.
  9. CCTV footage shows that a food was delivered at the Bhatia home on Saturday night, around 10:40 pm.
  10. Around 11 pm, Priyanka chatted with her cousin about wedding shopping.
  11. Sources: NDTV

बुराड़ी कांड : 11 मौत और घर की दीवार पर लगे 11 प ाइप !

नई दिल्ली: दिल्ली के बुराड़ी में एक ही परिवार के 11 लोगों की मौत की गुत्थी अब तक नहीं सुलझी है. ये मामला सामूहिक आत्महत्या का है या किसी बाहरी शख़्स ने हत्या की है ये अब तक साफ़ नहीं है. वहीं इस सनसनीखेज़ कांड में रोजाना नए खुलासे हो रहे हैं. अब 11 लोगों के पोस्टमार्टम की रिपोर्ट आ गई है, जिसमें उनकी मौत का कारण हैगिंग आया है. इसके अलावा चोट के और कोई निशान नहीं है. इस हत्याकांड को लेकर को पुलिस सूत्रों से कई जानकारियां मिली हैं. पुलिस सूत्रों के मुताबिक, जहां 10 लोगों के शव लटके हुए मिले, उसके पास ही एक कमरे से 2 रजिस्टर बरामद हुए हैं. जिस तरह से मौत हुई है वही तरीका दोनों रजिस्टर में लिखा गया है.
उधर, इन मौतों के पीछे तंत्र-मंत्र से जुड़ा एक और ऐंगल सामने आया है, जिस घर में 11 लोगों के शव मिले हैं उसकी बाहरी दीवार पर 11 पाइप लगे हुए हैं. इन 11 पाइपों से से 4 बड़ी हैं जो सीधी हैं, 7 अन्य पाइप का मुंह नीचे की ओर झुका है. इनमें से एक पाइप जिसका मुंह नीचे की ओर झुका हुआ है वह पाइप सबसे दूर है. यह दीवार के बगल से एक खाली प्लाट की तरफ है और शक है इन पाइप के पीछे भी कोई तंत्र मंत्र है. हालांकि इस परिवार के एक करीबी प्रवीण मित्तल को तंत्र-मंत्र के पीछे एक साथ खुदकुशी करने की बात उनके गले नहीं उतर रही. प्रवीण मित्तल पिछले बीस साल से परिवार को बेहद करीबी हैं और मृतक प्रियंका जिसकी शादी होने वाली थी वो इन्हें मुंह बोला भाई मानती थी. सभी 11 मृतकों की आंखों को उनके रिश्तेदारों के कहने पर दान किया गया. अब पोस्टमॉर्टम के बाद सभी का अंतिम संस्कार एक साथ कश्मीरी गेट के पास निगमबोध घाट पर होगा, क्योंकि इतने शव एक साथ राजस्थान के पैतृक गांव ले जाना आसान नहीं है. पुलिस सूत्रों के मुताबिक, दोनों रजिस्टर में मौत और मोक्ष को लेकर एक कहानीनुमा लंबा लेख है. जिसमें किसी आध्यात्मिक गुरु का नाम नहीं है, लेकिन मौत की क्रियाओं को लेकर एक बड़ा हिस्सा है, क्राइम ब्रांच इस हत्याकांड की गुत्थी सुलझाने में जुटी है.

Nationalists on Twitter, this fall is nothing like 2013

One dollar was worth Rs55.6 on May 22, 2013. Towards the end of August 2013, it had crossed Rs69, in daily trade.During this period, a lot of famous Indian personalities took to Twitter and equated the fall to the nation losing face. Earlier this week, the dollar crossed Rs69 again. But this time around, the country doesn’t seem to have lost any face.

Consider the reasons behind the rupee losing value against the dollar. In the aftermath of the financial crisis that broke out in September 2008, the Federal Reserve of the US, started “quantitative easing”. The Fed printed dollars to flood the financial system with more money and drive down interest rates. The hope was at lower interest rates, people would spend, businesses would expand, and the economy would recover.

While that happened to some extent, what also happened was that large financial institutions borrowed money in dollars at low interest rates and invested them in stock and bond markets across the world. The Fed has now made it clear that it is in the process of gradually withdrawing these dollars which it had printed. With this, the interest rates in the US are expected to go up.

At higher interest rates, it doesn’t make sense for many large financial institutions which had borrowed and invested, to stay invested in India and other parts of the world. This is why the foreign institutional investors have sold stocks and bonds worth Rs61,104 crore, from April 2018 onwards.

They need to convert these rupees into dollars, in order to repatriate their money. This increases the demand for the dollar and pushes down the value of the rupee. On April 2, 2018, one dollar was worth Rs 65.1. Now it’s worth close to Rs 69.

This is pretty much a global phenomenon. Currencies like the South African rand, the South Korean won, the Thai baht, the Indonesian rupiah, the Chinese yuan, etc., have all lost value against the dollar. Also, as long as the Fed continues to suck out the printed dollars and increase interest rates, this phenomenon is expected to continue. Only a recession in the US can reverse this.

As on June 29, 2018, the price of the Indian basket of crude stood at $76.4 per barrel. In 2017-2018, the price had averaged at $56.4 per barrel. India’s dependence on imported oil has gone up over the years. In 2017-2018, it stood at 82.8%. During April-May 2018, it increased further to 83.8%. When oil prices go up, oil marketing companies need more dollars to buy oil. This increases the demand for dollars and pushes down the value of the rupee. Oil prices are expected to remain high, until Saudi Aramco, the largest oil company in the world, completes its initial public offering (IPO).

In 2017-2018, India bought 8.5% of its total oil imports from Iran. Oil is bought and sold internationally in US dollars. Iran allows India to buy oil in other currencies. The American sanctions against Iran come into force from November 2018. There is great pressure on India to stop buying oil from Iran in the months to come. If India does that and moves to buying oil from other countries, the demand for dollars will go up further, leading to the rupee continuing to remain weak.

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has been intervening in the foreign exchange market to protect the value of the rupee against the dollar. Nevertheless, one thing that the South East Asian crisis of 1997 taught us was that a central bank should not get obsessed with the idea of protecting the value of its currency at any cost – something the RBI is not doing. This is because the RBI needs to sell dollars and buy rupees, in order to protect the value of the rupee.

The RBI does not have an unlimited supply of dollars. Not that India is short of dollars, but it’s always a good idea to let the currency find its right level.

Vivek Kaul, author of the Easy Money trilogy

Dailyhunt

Index of Eight Core Industries (Base: 2011-12=100) May, 2018

1.       The summary of the Index of Eight Core Industries (base: 2011-12) is given at the Annexure.

2.       The Eight Core Industries comprise 40.27 per cent of the weight of items included in the Index of Industrial Production (IIP).  The combined Index of Eight Core Industries stands at 131.4 in May, 2018, which was 3.6 per cent higher as compared to the index of May, 2017. Its cumulative growth during April to May, 2018-19 was 4.1 per cent.

Coal

3.       Coal production (weight: 10.33 per cent) increased by 12.1 per cent in May, 2018 over May, 2017. Its cumulative index increased by 14.0 per cent during April to May, 2018-19 over corresponding period of the previous year.

Crude Oil

4.       Crude Oil production (weight: 8.98 per cent) declined by 2.9 per cent in May, 2018 over May, 2017. Its cumulative index declined by 1.9 per cent during April to May, 2018-19 over the corresponding period of previous year.

Natural Gas

5.       The Natural Gas production (weight: 6.88 per cent) declined by 1.4 per cent in May, 2018 over May, 2017. Its cumulative index increased by 2.0 per cent during April to May, 2018-19 over the corresponding period of previous year.

Refinery Products

6.       Petroleum Refinery production (weight: 28.04 per cent) increased by 4.9 per cent in May, 2018 over May, 2017. Its cumulative index increased by 3.9 per cent during April to May, 2018-19 over the corresponding period of previous year.

Fertilizers

7.       Fertilizers production (weight: 2.63 per cent) increased by 8.4 per cent in May, 2018 over May, 2017. Its cumulative index increased by 6.6 per cent during April to May, 2018-19 over the corresponding period of previous year.

Steel

8.       Steel production (weight: 17.92 per cent) increased by 0.5 per cent in May, 2018 over May, 2017. Its cumulative index increased by 2.1 per cent during April to May, 2018-19 over the corresponding period of previous year.

Cement

9.       Cement production (weight: 5.37 per cent) increased by 5.2 per cent in May, 2018 over May, 2017. Its cumulative index increased by 10.7 per cent during April to May, 2018-19 over the corresponding period of previous year.

Electricity

10.     Electricity generation (weight: 19.85 per cent) increased by 3.5 per cent in May, 2018 over May, 2017. Its cumulative index increased by 2.8 per cent during April to May, 2018-19 over the corresponding period of previous year.

Note 1: Data for March, 2018, April, 2018 and May, 2018 are provisional.

Note 2: Since April, 2014, Electricity generation data from Renewable sources are also included.

Note 3: The industry-wise weights indicated above are individual industry weight derived from IIP and blown up on pro rata basis to a combined weight of ICI equal to 100.

Note 4: Release of the index for June, 2018 will be on Tuesday, 31st July, 2018.

Annexure

Performance of Eight Core Industries

Yearly Index & Growth Rate

Base Year: 2011-12=100

Index

Sector Weight 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 Apr-May 2017-18 Apr-May 2018-19
Coal 10.3335 103.2 104.2 112.6 118.0 121.8 124.9 107.4 122.4
Crude Oil 8.9833 99.4 99.2 98.4 97.0 94.5 93.7 95.1 93.3
Natural Gas 6.8768 85.6 74.5 70.5 67.2 66.5 68.4 66.6 67.9
Refinery Products 28.0376 107.2 108.6 108.8 114.1 119.7 125.2 120.7 125.4
Fertilizers 2.6276 96.7 98.1 99.4 106.4 106.6 106.6 93.7 99.9
Steel 17.9166 107.9 115.8 121.7 120.2 133.1 140.5 138.5 141.4
Cement 5.3720 107.5 111.5 118.1 123.5 122.0 129.7 125.4 138.9
Electricity 19.8530 104.0 110.3 126.6 133.8 141.6 149.2 154.4 158.7
Overall Index 100.0000 103.8 106.5 111.7 115.1 120.5 125.7 122.7 127.8

 

Growth Rates (in per cent)

Sector Weight 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 Apr-May 2017-18 Apr-May 2018-19
Coal 10.3335 3.2 1.0 8.0 4.8 3.2 2.6 -3.2 14.0
Crude Oil 8.9833 -0.6 -0.2 -0.9 -1.4 -2.5 -0.9 0.1 -1.9
Natural Gas 6.8768 -14.4 -12.9 -5.3 -4.7 -1.0 2.9 3.3 2.0
Refinery Products 28.0376 7.2 1.4 0.2 4.9 4.9 4.6 2.8 3.9
Fertilizers 2.6276 -3.3 1.5 1.3 7.0 0.2 0.03 -0.5 6.6
Steel 17.9166 7.9 7.3 5.1 -1.3 10.7 5.6 6.3 2.1
Cement 5.3720 7.5 3.7 5.9 4.6 -1.2 6.3 -3.3 10.7
Electricity 19.8530 4.0 6.1 14.8 5.7 5.8 5.3 6.8 2.8
Overall Index 100.0000 3.8 2.6 4.9 3.0 4.8 4.3 3.3 4.1

 

Performance of Eight Core Industries

Monthly Index & Growth Rate

Base Year: 2011-12=100

Index

Sector Coal Crude Oil Natural Gas Refinery Products Fertilizers Steel Cement Electricity Overall Index
Weight 10.3335 8.9833 6.8768 28.0376 2.6276 17.9166 5.3720 19.8530 100.0000
May-17 111.8 97.6 69.7 125.4 98.3 142.9 128.6 158.1 126.8
Jun-17 107.6 94.1 69.3 119.4 107.3 138.0 132.0 147.4 121.7
Jul-17 98.5 96.4 72.2 119.4 108.6 131.3 122.4 151.9 120.4
Aug-17 101.3 95.1 69.5 121.6 115.4 139.0 117.3 155.4 123.0
Sep-17 103.1 92.0 68.8 122.7 105.3 138.7 119.8 150.5 122.0
Oct-17 119.4 95.7 71.0 132.1 116.8 146.7 125.2 149.8 128.7
Nov-17 133.5 90.8 68.5 126.0 111.8 137.5 125.4 140.1 124.1
Dec-17 142.6 94.2 69.2 133.1 112.1 138.0 135.3 143.9 128.8
Jan-18 149.5 93.8 67.6 135.4 105.5 145.0 140.6 149.5 132.5
Feb-18 143.2 86.1 62.1 120.9 102.2 141.7 138.0 136.1 123.2
Mar-18 185.0 95.8 69.8 130.3 107.0 153.2 148.9 156.7 138.4
Apr-18 119.6 91.8 67.1 119.1 93.1 139.2 142.4 153.7 124.2
May-18 125.3 94.8 68.7 131.6 106.6 143.7 135.3 163.7 131.4

 

 

Growth Rates (in per cent)

Sector Coal Crude Oil Natural Gas Refinery Products Fertilizers Steel Cement Electricity Overall Index
Weight 10.3335 8.9833 6.8768 28.0376 2.6276 17.9166 5.3720 19.8530 100.0000
May-17 -3.2 0.7 4.5 5.4 -5.9 3.8 -1.4 8.2 3.9
Jun-17 -6.7 0.6 6.4 -0.2 -2.7 6.0 -3.3 2.2 1.0
Jul-17 0.6 -0.5 6.6 -2.7 0.2 9.4 1.0 6.6 2.9
Aug-17 15.4 -1.6 4.2 2.4 -0.6 2.2 0.7 8.3 4.4
Sep-17 10.4 0.1 6.3 8.1 -7.7 3.7 0.1 3.4 4.7
Oct-17 3.9 -0.4 2.8 7.5 3.0 8.6 -1.3 3.2 5.0
Nov-17 0.7 0.2 2.4 8.2 0.3 14.5 16.9 3.9 6.9
Dec-17 0.4 -2.1 1.1 6.6 3.0 0.4 17.7 4.4 3.8
Jan-18 3.8 -3.2 -1.2 11.0 -1.6 1.7 19.6 7.7 6.2
Feb-18 1.3 -2.4 -1.8 7.8 5.2 5.0 23.0 4.6 5.4
Mar-18 9.1 -1.6 0.9 1.1 3.2 4.7 13.0 6.0 4.4
Apr-18 16.0 -0.8 5.8 2.7 4.6 3.8 16.5 2.1 4.6
May-18 12.1 -2.9 -1.4 4.9 8.4 0.5 5.2 3.5 3.6

 

***

Consumer Price Index for Industrial Workers (CPI-IW) — May, 2018

The All-India CPI-IW for May, 2018 increased by 1 point and pegged at 289 (two hundred and eighty nine). On 1-month percentage change, it increased by (+) 0.35 percent between April, 2018 and May, 2018 when compare with the increase of (+) 0.36 percent between the corresponding months of previous year.

The maximum upward pressure to the change in current index came from Food group contributing (+) 0.68 percentage points to the total change. At item level, Rice, Groundnut Oil, Fish Fresh, Poultry (Chicken), Eggs (Hen), Mik, Pure Ghee, Chillies Green, Onion, Brinjal, Cabbage, Carrot, French Bean, Green Coriander Leaves, Palak, Potato, Radish, etc. are responsible for the increase in index. owever, this increase was checked by Wheat, Wheat Atta, Mustard Oil, Chillies Dry, Lady’s Finger, Mango (Ripe), Torai, etc., putting downward pressure on the index.

The year-on-year inflation based on CPI-IW stood at 3.96 percent for May, 2018 as compared to 3.97 percent for the previous month and 1.09 percent during the corresponding month of the previous year. Similarly, the Food inflation stood at 1.66 percent against 1.33 percent of the previous month and (-) 1.63 percent during the corresponding month of the previous year.

At centre level, Sholapur and Bhilai reported the maximum increase of 6 points each followed by Pune, Kodarma and Godavarikhani (5 points each). Among others, 4 points increase was observed in 2 centres, 3 points in 6 centres, 2 points in 18 centres and 1 point in 15 centres. On the contrary, Chhindwara, Darjeeling, Jalandhar, Jaipur and Ghaziabad recorded a maximum decrease of 2 points each. Among others, 1 point decrease was observed in 12 centres. Rest of the 15 centres’ indices remained stationary.

The indices of 36 centres are above All-India Index and 9 centres’ indices are below national average. The indices of Mumbai, Jabalpur and Chhindwara centres remained at par with All-India Index.

The next issue of CPI-IW for the month of June, 201 will be released on Tuesday, 31st July, 2018. The same will also be available on the office website www.labourbureaunew.gov.in.

*****